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20130124
20130201
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CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 6
CNNW 4
CNN 3
CNBC 2
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Jan 24, 2013 12:00pm PST
and structure our environments so that we change behavior in those environments and we develop natural barriers that control the movement of people through environments. so, one of the key aspects is ensuring that a property is beautiful, this it's functional, that it's welcoming and that it reduces the fears of crime, that it allows an environment where people take ownership and accountability for the properties that they occupy, either live, work or study in. >> kelly, really interesting and i don't mean to get too heady here but this reminded reading about it about the discipline and punish and talking about the design of the prison and the changes that the prison -- prison design had taken over the course of a century and the affect on the national psyche. and discipline through design. and what can happen there and i imagine it's very important to you to create space that is are safe but that don't feel oppressive and fortified. >> that's so true. it's -- you know, when you have an environment that is fortified that has these very blatant or obtrusive barriers or security features, what it
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 12:00pm EST
, and that they that as a person that has covered the environment for as long as i have, the surprise me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. the interior department today is going to put out rules for fracking on public land. correct me if i wrong, but you almost make the case that that corporate philosophy gave them a blood spot. even more surprising because you make an amazing point, and i remember this. as a young engineer the company, he was using the technique. and so do you think in that one case, that corporate philosophy of manager risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do hindered them from tapping into what is now is used economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> there were slow, but they are often slow. then there decisive. they get there late in by there weekend. they've never had a reputation faugh. they have a story they tell themselves about their successes. and they have some degree by and large their strength is financial and operating. generally if they fail to discover something for themselves they can buy it. they've been trying to
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2013 12:00am EST
think that, as a person that's covered energy and environment for as long as i have -- this surprised me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. today going to put out rauls for fracking on public lands. and you almost -- and you almost make the case that corporation prosecute -- that corporate philosophy gave them a blind spot when it came to high drawlic fracturing, and you make an amazing point that rex tillerton, as a young engineer at the company, actually was using the technique and so do you think in that one case in the fracking case, that corporate philosophy of, let's manage our risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do -- hinder them from tapping into what is now this huge gas, huge economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> guest: they were slow but they're often slow and then they're dissive. so they get to places late and then buy their way in. that's their pattern. never had a great reputation as the greatest spoil goss discoverers. i'm sure they have some wins and a story they tell. thes about successes in exploratio
CNBC
Jan 24, 2013 4:00am EST
, more nationalism and an economic environment that people are not totally pessimistic, but i think they expect to see more going forward. >> an thonenny jenkins from barclay's. good to see you. thanks for joining us. pick up with barclay's. what are the expectations of what they're going to do with that transformation and job cuts? but he clearly made the point. he said when we had strong revenue growth, the banking system as a whole didn't have to worry about cost. now we've got the right costs for the new environment we're in. and is this a cross to the board picture? >> definitely. banking ultimately is such for the underlying economy. so i think it doesn't take an economy to tell us that the next couple of years is going to be choppy and not the growth we've had for the last 20 years. banking has to go back to basics. fist, think about your revenue and cost base. here on the cost base, huge improvements. they've always been unmanaged because the revenue is growing so, you know, clearly matched to pay people twice as much as we have to. today, people working from i.t. to legal t
CNN
Jan 24, 2013 7:00pm PST
here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> tonight, tackling the sandwich messaging. a subway foot long, only 11 inches on facebook. the picture went viral. and subway responded, with regards to the bread and calling it a foot long, subway foot long is a registered trademark, as a descriptive name of the subs sold in subways and not a measurement of length. that certainly clears it up. and the black forest ham doesn't come from a black forest and the buffalo chicken contains no actual buffalo. little known fact. and people the world over have started measuring their foot longs and posting pictures online. and wouldn't you know it, two lawsuits in the works, one in new jersey and one in illinois, seeking more than $5 million in damages. $5 million foot long doesn't have the same ring to it. $5 million seems like a lot when we are talking about one bite of a sandwich. he
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2013 5:00pm EST
innovation and entrepreneurship. each of us is committed to fostering the kind of environment that supports the private sector and which turns ideas into innovations, innovations into products, products into companies that help create good jobs. under current policy, one way we do that federally is by supporting research and development through the existing r&d tax credit. companies that invest in r&d generate new products which sparks new industries with spillover benefits for all kinds of sectors. that's why there's long been strong bipartisan support for the existing r&d tax credit. by all accounts, it's working. the r&d credit has helped tens of thousands of american companies succeed and create jobs. but there's a critical gap in the existing r&d credit. it isn't available to start-ups because they're not yet profitable. and, thus, they don't have an income tax liability against which to take a credit. in fact, more than half the r&d credit last year was taken by companies with revenue over a billion, well-established, profitable companies. there's nothing wrong with that. it's just no
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 7:00am EST
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 5:00pm EST
round. it has a rugged ability, meant for a combat or environment that one would be placed in facing adversaries, human beings, people. that weapon can be retrofitted enhanceth other devices to your offensive capability. the weapon itself has features to adjusted, optics sites, for example, that can cost hundreds of dollars and i have shot this weapon many times. it would enhance our capability in various tactical maneuvers whether it is from the shoulder or the hip or whether you choose to spray fire the weapon or individually shoot from the shoulder. the optic sites are amazing. the technology advances that weapon as -- that weapon is the weapon of our time. that is where we find ourselves today and certainly, i believe, is meant for the battlefield and a public safety environment only. >> thank you. mr. chairman, before i yield my time, i would like to submit testimony of maya ronman who is here today lost her father in a shooting in september in minneapolis. i would like unanimous consent to submit your testimony for the record. >> as we indicated earlier, there will be other sta
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2013 1:00am EST
these decisions have on the environment that the u.s. is in. for most of history, we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can fight, but so that we can not fight. the other. that time made that is important -- the other point that tom made is to understand what is involved in military operations. there is a piece on the web that explains exactly what it is we can do with the troops we have at the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan. it is not just about bureaucrats in d.c.. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. do you does want to talk about that and several surrounding decisions? >> we have become very accustomed to throwing around numbers of troops, and people have gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious. the effect of that is that very few americans actually understand that there is a method for figuring out how many troops are actually needed to accomplish something. when the recommendation comes from a military commander, this cannot just, as this white house seems to think, the co
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 12:00pm EST
in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the store was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not heard anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me and on reasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles and the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because everyone they know voted against him.
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 8:00pm EST
? in 1992, you had the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the story was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not hurt anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles in the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because ever
CSPAN
Jan 26, 2013 2:00pm EST
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
CNBC
Jan 29, 2013 9:00am EST
will fight a rising ten-year yield environment. we're now 197. at least as of close of business yesterday. by june, a little above 2%. by the end of the year, 2.13%. not a lot. that may be one of the ropes why wall street is not so optimistic about stocks. it's got to fight this rising treasury yield. we'll see later in the afternoon that they're more optimistic about growth. they finally increased the gdp outlook but not by very much. let's look at what wall street thinks of the effect of this quantitative easing will have. pessimistic as they have been each time we asked this question about the ability of quantitative easing to lower unemployment. only 34% say qe will help in that regard. how about when it comes to lowering mortgage rates. a little more optimism. 54% versus 42%. bond yields, evenly split, 47%, 47%. but what can qe do? it can raise stock prices. 69% say it will have an effect on raising stock prices. we want to move on now to the next bit of the survey. when will the federal reserve hike rates. these are two distribution charts. it shows where the percentage of responden
CNN
Jan 26, 2013 10:00am PST
and cannot get a job is not the best environment in which to run a business. >> so that's interesting because this is a woman who is now one of the top positions at a public company. at aol. so then someone on the complete opposite side i talked to, john chambers, ceo of cisco, staunch republican, endorsed romney. he said they've got nearly $40 billion overseas. he has no intention of bringing it back to the u.s. unless policy changes. he said the place to do business. >> let me guess. >> what. >> then russia. he's making appoint with russia. he's making a point with russia, but canada. >> interesting. >> he just thinks if the policy doesn't change here, he's not going to bring the money to work here. you acquire companies where you're wanted clearly sending a message to the administration. i don't know if it's going to change everything. >> interesting to hear from different people. in one blaiplace such divergent views. good to see you, as always. >> you can see more interviews and all of our interviews from davos on cnn money.com. we'll be right back. >>> as the 43rd world economic forum w
FOX News
Jan 25, 2013 6:00am PST
think about job creation, energy independence, protecting the environment, all of that is done with this route. so to me, he is at a stage where he could approve it and should approve it. again, i don't mind him taking 60 days to review it. i understand that but let's don't, we shouldn't have this go on the entire year. it is really now time for the president to act. bill: it's a lot of jobs and goes right to the heart of our energy policy as you would argue. the left considers this product dirty oil. what do you say to that? >> i say to that, look at the big picture. this is about energy independence. you know what? i've talked to young men and women who are over defending our country in the middle east because of oil. i don't want them over there for those reasons. if we reduce our dependence on middle eastern oil we'll be a lot safer in our country, economically, national kurtwise. we can move this oil relatively safely. that doesn't mean there won't be a spill. it could be localized. you can never say there won't be any spills but the report suggests it would be minimal in
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2013 11:00pm EST
in the affordable care at. .. unfortunately that is the environment that we are living in. it was a very interesting panel especially the last one. there is nothing better than congressional staffers actually hear from people who practice medicine. you know, patients are going through their treatments. one of the things that the reality that we suffer with, unfortunately, and this is something we all have to deal with, it is just a physical reality. as he rightly pointed out, it is right now the debate about budget and people are trying to figure how to control costs and figure out savings that are scored by studios. the cbo gets a lot of bad rap from people. but i am a fan. they have a very tough job to do. they always come out and it's a very tough job that they have to do and it's hard to please everyone in a town like washington dc and they try to be the best that can. i afford a lot of respect to them. at the end of the day, that is the reality that we have to operate under. so we get a lot of ideas from utah, we have the great health care system, which is a lot of integrated health care delive
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2013 12:00pm EST
the right environment is the most important. how we can create this environment today with this kind of unstability, we need political stability. we need peace. we have struggle between the palestinians and israelis and egypt. we have to talk about it and be very frank to see how we can get to the end of this. for this reason, yes, frankly speaking i'm not very optimistic about all today. if i ask anyone what you want me to talk to about, talk about democracy, freedom, transparency, governments, rulers. let us work for this and this is very important. >> let me ask --, let me ask someone who has worked with some of these institutions under the most ex-rd nary conditions. you have helped functioning institution in the west bank. you created an economy that created extraordinary growth over the last three years and you've done it under very adverse circumstances. so what would be your advice to people trying to build these institutions? >> thank you. honestly i continue to the effort help the institutions not just myself and to get ready for the emergence of fully independent and state
NBC
Jan 26, 2013 5:00am EST
's a small environment for lots of people. >> they are calling it the ferrari virus because it moves so fast. the best way to get rid of it is disinfecting surfaces with bleach and keeping your hands clean. meanwhile, the flu continues to hit people coast-to-coast but there are signs flu season is leveling off and continues to decline hear in the east. our news reporter ericka east tells us there are some home remedies that might make you feel better. >> many swear by anti-viral medicines, like tamiflu. but you have to get them within 48 hours of getting sick. that's when home remedies come into play. >> whisky honey and lemon juice was the home remedy. >> that was used as inspiration when creating her home remedy. it's jenny's sore bayh. >> using things like honey would be really soothing. there's a little bit of cayenne pepper that might help with congestion. >> oh, yeah, and a dose of liquor. >> the whisky kind of relaxes you. >> for the record this is not medicine. it's comfort food like a giant cough drop with a kick. >> most of these things relate to symptom management. feeling better
FOX News
Jan 27, 2013 3:00am PST
, in a professional environment, they've got to think about themselves like a professional. and the other is don't worry about the paycheck. yes, my book is called all work, no pay, it's a joke, but if you're an unpaid intern you should only be working 12 to 15 hours per week at a structured, structured, safe environment, but if it's -- if you're choosing between a paid opportunity, and an unpaid opportunity, it's not about the paycheck, it's about the experience. which is going to be more beneficial for you and help you after you graduate. >> tucker: smart advice. >> ainsley: and a tip he she was clayton's intern at one time. see you're doing well. >> thank you. >> ainsley: and farmers selling products without a permit, but they are not going down without a fight. we'll explain. great segment. [ female announcer ] your smile. like other precious things that start off white, it yellows over time. fact is, when it comes to your smile, if you're not whitening, you're yellowing. crest 3d white whitestrips go below the enamel surface to whiten as well as $500 professional treatments, at a fraction o
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 7:00am EST
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
CNN
Jan 24, 2013 4:00pm EST
is have the person go over their memory as if it was happening again but they are in a safe environment. >> they say it looks like a video game but when you put the goggles on, it brings you to the same scenario. >> you put on the sounds, the sound of wind. >> and we can blow stuff up. >> therapy has been effective. i was never a fan of prolonged exposure and that kind of thing because it's an uncomfortable thing. >> at its core, therapy has to induce some level of anxiety so that you're processing hard memories. i'm skip, clinical psychologist at the university of california institute for creative technologies. let's go. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing the all-new cadillac xts... another big night on the town, eh? ...and the return of life lived large. ♪ humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto policies come with accident forgiveness if you qualify, where your rates won't go up due to your first accident, and new car replacement, where, if you total
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2013 9:00am EST
are but a manifestation of the brilliance of nature to enable us to adapt to the environment in which we evolved, that somehow these characteristics determine our inate worth and value as human beings. that is the essence of racism. but that system was not cultivated into every intellectual commercial, judicial, religious philosophical medical system that we have. the imbalances you see in the country today -- i call them inequities' -- are but reflections of that deep-seated belief. is it a conscious in most of us? no. in some of us, ys. -- yes. i aniston the ku klux klan -- i understand the ku klux klan was going to have a rally. some people consciously adhere to that belief. but most of us have been swept up in it and we do not even know wit. it is easy to be at the top and never have to think about it. it is impossible to be on the bottom and not think about that on a daily basis and not internalize the absurdity of the devaluation of your humanity on a daily basis. my lovely daughter once said to me, "how did the story of african-americans get inverted into a story of victimization only?" "
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2013 12:00pm EST
and the environment who blazed a trail from pwhraobg lynn to ranch -- brooklyn to rancho mirage in the united states senate, to one who is committed to stand for violence and equality. from a cantankerous maverick and patriot and former prisoner of war from arizona, from a song-writing compassionate conservative from utah; from a fervent, gravel-voiced people's champion from ohio; from a soft-spoken loyal, medal of honor winner from hawaii who used to sit right here; from a college professor turned proud prairie populist and senate pied piper taken from us far too soon and far too quickly. from every member of the senate there are characteristics, passions, quirks and beliefs that bring this place alive and unite to make it the most extraordinary legislative body on earth. that's what i love about the senate. i love that instead of fighting against each other, bill frist, the former republican leader, and i were able to join forces to fight h.i.v. and aids around the globe and convince an unlikely conservative named jesse helms to support and pass a bill unanimously that saved millions of lives on o
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)